Faculty of Philosophy

Philosophy Course| Bachelor of Philosophy| Diploma in Philosophy| three year cycle | Two Year Cycle |Synopsis

 

FACULTY OF PHILOSOPHY
A. Philosophy Course

Duration of the Course
           The Course of Philosophy extends over a period of three years for non-graduates and two years for graduates, each year is divided into two semesters.

Admission
           For admission to the course of Philosophy the applicant must hold a pre-degree/plus two or a degree certificate and have an adequate knowledge of the ancient and modern languages (judged necessary by the Syndicate for admission to the course).

Programme of Studies
           The Subjects of the Philosophy Course are divided into three parts:

Part I Languages:
                       First language - English
                       Second language - Malayalam
                       Optional Languages - Latin, Sanskrit, Syriac

Part II Philosophy:
           A. Systematic Philosophy - Western
                       Philosophy of Knowledge (Logic & Epistemology)
                       Philosophy of Man (Philosophical Anthropology)
                       Philosophy of Being (Metaphysics)
                       Philosophy of the World (Cosmology)
                       Philosophy of God (Theodicy)
                       Moral Philosophy (Ethics)
                       Philosophy of Religion
                       Philosophy of Science
                       Eco-Philosophy
           B. Systematic Philosophy - Indian
                       The Carvaka Philosophy
                        Buddhism, Jainism, Nyaya, Vaisesika
                        Samkhya, Yoga, Mimamsa, Vedanta
                        Dalit Philosophy, Tribal Philosophy
           C. History of Philosophy
                        Western Philosophy
                        Indian Philosophy
            D. Optional Subjects
                        Philosophy of Technology
                        Artificial Intelligence
                        Philosophical Aesthetics
                        Philosophical Hermeneutics
                        Philosophy of Sri. Narayana Guru
                        Political Philosophy

Part III Subsidiary Subjects:
             A. Religion and Spirituality
                       Introduction to the Bible
                       The Historical Books of the Old Testament
                       Spiritual Theology
                       Indian Spirituality
                       Introduction to Sacred Liturgy
            B. Human and Social Sciences
                       Anatomy and Physiology
                       Experimental Psychology
                       Sociology
                       Theories of Science
                       Journalism

B. Degree of Bachelor of Philosophy
                       The degree of bachelor of philosophy is conferred on those who successfully complete the course in philosophy which extends over a period of three years for the non-graduates and two years for the graduates.
To be eligible for the B.Ph. degree course, the students should obtain 60% marks in the aggregate for subjects other than languages of the first and the second year of the philosophy course (for the non-graduates who follow the three year cycle) or of the first year of the philosophy course (for the graduates who follow the two year cycle).
A written dissertation on a philosophical theme with a minimum of 6000 words directed by one of the teachers of the Faculty should be submitted by the students during the final year of the course. At the end of the Bachelor’s course in Philosophy, there will be comprehensive examinations, both written and oral, in the subjects of Philosophy (Part II). The oral examination is conducted by a panel of examiners. The students must get 50% marks for a pass in the comprehensive examinations, both written and oral.
C. Diploma in Philosophy
                    The Basic Course in Philosophy coincides with the three years of Philosophy of the first cycle for non-graduates and two years for graduates. In order to secure a pass the student should obtain 40% marks in individual subjects in the semestral examinations and 40% marks in the final comprehensive written examination. Besides, a written dissertation with a minimum of 3500 words directed by one of the teachers of the Faculty should be submitted by the student during the final year of the course. The basic course students who successfully complete the prescribed course receive the Diploma in Philosophy

Philosophy - Three Year Cycle

I YEAR
 

First Semester

Subjects

Professors

Credits

English

Maraparambil     
Kannaparamba

4

Malayalam

Sr. Jolly          

4

Premus P.

 

 

Human Physiology

Cheruparambil T.

1

Anc. West. Philosophy

Kannany T.

3

Liturgy

Nariculam A.

2

Sp.Theology

Mundolickal P.

2

Intr. to Philosophy

Kakkattuthadathil T.

1

Logic

Kannany T

3

Exp. Psychology

Madan P.

4

Optional Languages:

                       

2

Sanskrit

Kurukoor G.

 

Latin

Thonippara A.

 

Syriac

Sr. Jincy

 

Second Semester

English

Maraparambil

5

Kannaparamban

 

 

Malayalam

Sr. Jolly

4

Premus P.

 

 

Symbolic Logic

Kannany T.

 3

Medieval Philosophy

Nellikunnel J.

3

Indian Philosophy

Cheranthuruthy A.

2

Introduction to Bible

Mulloor J.

2

Methodology

Nariculam A

1

 

 

 

Optional Languages:

                        2

 

Sanskrit

Kurukoor G.

 

Latin

Thonippara A

.

Syriac

Sr. Jincy

 

           

 

 


II Year
 

First  Semester

Subjects
Professors
Credits

English

Maraparambil
Kannaparamban

4

 

 

 

Modern Philosophy

Nellikunnel J.
Premus P.

4

Malayalam

Sr. Jolly

3

 

 

 

Science & Technology

Pamplany A.

3

Journalism

Mundadan K.

2

Metaphysics

Kannany T.

3

Book Review

Keeranpara F.

1

Sociology

Nellissery

4

Second Semester

Indian philosophy

Thadathil J.

5

English

Maraparambil
Kannaparamban

3

Malayalam

Sr. Jolly

5

Premus P.

 

 

Marxism

Kakkattuthadthil T.

1

Contemporary Phil.

Vallooran A.

4

Ethics

Kakkattuthadthil T.

5

Sp.Theology

Mundolickal P.

2

 

 

 


III Year
 

First Semester

Subjects Professors Credits

Theodicy

Vallooran A.

5

Philosophy of Man

Palamoottil S.

5

Cosmology

Kakkattuthadathil T.

4

Sp.Theology

Mundolickal P.

2

Philosophy of Science

Pamplany A.

2

Postmodernity     

Kundukulam V.

4

Indian Spirituality    

Cheruparampil T.

1

Seminar

 

2

Second Semester

 

 

Epistemology

Palamoottil S.

4

Phil. of Religion

Thadathil J.

4

Christian Phil.

Nellikunnel J.

2

Mysticism & Philosophy

Cheruparampil

2

Bible - Historical Books

Thondiparambil J.

3

Optionals:                  

 

2

Political Philosophy

                               

2

Postmodern Philosophy

                               

2

Seminar

                               

2


Philosophy  Two Year Cycle
I YEAR

 First Semester
 

Subjects
Professors
Credits

English

Etturuthil J.

2

Malayalam

Primus P.

2

Logic

Sujan A.

5

Greek Philosophy

Kathirparambil K.

3

Latin

Kathirparambil K.

2

Introduction to Ind.Philosophy

Payyappilly J.

2

Introduction to Bible

Mathirapilly S.

2

Science

Edwin X.

2

Introduction to Philosophy

Sujan A.

1

Methodology

Kathirparambil K.

1

Human Physiology

Variath V.

1

Sanskrit

Arackal F.

2

Second Semester

 

 

Exp. Psychology

Variath V.

4

Modern Philosophy

Sujan A.

4

Sociology

Chiramel J

3

Cosmology

Kakkattuthadail T.

4

Medieval Philosophy

Kathirparambil K.

3

Indian Philosophy

Correya B.

4

(B.Gita Carvaka Buddhism Jainism Darsanas Saiva Siddhanta) 

Spiritual Theology

Etturuthil J.

2

Indian Spiritiuality

Kanichai  C.

1


FINAL YEAR
 

Subjects
Professors
Credits

First Semester

 

 

Contemporary  Philosophy

Kakkattuthadthil T.

5

Indian Philosophy (Dalit Philosophy)

Correya B.

2

Indian Philosophy (Tribal Philosophy)          

Correya B.

2

Metaphysics

Kannany T. 

5

Journalism

Mundadan K.

2

Spiritual Theology

Etturuthil J.

2

Philosophical Anthropology

Kathirparambil K.

5

Seminar

Kathirparambil K.  

2

Sujan A.

 

 

Second Semester 

Ethics

Kathirparambil K.

5

Theodicy

Kannany T.

5

Contemporary Ind. Philosophy

Alunkal S.

2

Epistemology

Sujan A.

4

Book Review

Kathirparambil K.

1

Bible

Mathirappilly S.

2

Philosophy of Religion

Kanichai C.

2

Science

Edwin X.

2

Optional Subjects:

 

2

Philosophy of Art (Aesthetics)

Kathirparambil K.

 

Philosophical Hermenutics

Kochuveettil P.

 

Philosophy of Mind

Sujan A.

 

Synopsis

I. Systematic Philosophy- Western (SP)
 

SP 1.  Epistemology (4)
           Epistemology attempts to answer one of the basic questions in philosophy: What distinguishes true and adequate knowledge from false and inadequate knowledge? (Practically this question translates into issues of scientific methodology: how can one develop theories that are better than competing theories?) This course in its first part introduces the basic concepts and issues in epistemology such as Knowledge - pramâ, Sources of Knowledge - pramânâs, Justification, Certainty and Truth. And then in contrast to the of rigid programme of traditional epistemology, an attempt will be made to discover the human and social dimension of knowledge, with the help of a critical survey of continental hermeneutic tradition and the findings of sociology of knowledge. The course will be concluded with a consideration the problem of method in epistemology which will eventually equip the students with the ability to make and assess varied knowledge-claims.
                                                                                             Palamoottil S./Sujan A.
SP 2. Philosophy of Religion (4)
             Philosophy of Religion is a sub-discipline of (analytic) philosophy, and not of Religious Studies. It makes rational assessment of religious truth-claims. However epistemic justification of religious beliefs is not an essential requirement for spitritual experience. (Yet a fruitful discussion on the congnivity of religion is indispensable for a philosophically oriented religious believer.) It is a second order intellectual activity dealing with the rationality of religious knowledge-claims. This course, being an introduction, will first discuss the meaning and nature of religion and then in the same chapter, from  a heuristic point of view, the distinction between Philosophy of Religion and Religious Philosophies will be clarified. A critical assessment of  different religious as well as naturalistic theories of the origin and development of religion will be made in the second chapter. The third part of  the course is devoted to bring out the cognitive components of religious beliefs and varied interpretations offered to them by different religious traditions. The ethical and spiritual directives of a few major religions will be surveyed  in the next part. The final part will examine the mutual and  joint influence of society and religion in the process of  the development of culture.
                                                                                           Thadathil J./Kanichai C.
SP 3.  Philosophical Anthropology (5)
        The philosophy of man attempts to answer the most basic and perennial questions about man in the light of modern scientific researches and metaphysical principles. The course begins with a historical survey of the various scientific and philosophical views on man proposed by thinkers in the past as well as in the present. This is followed by a discussion of the main constituents of the human nature, namely, subjectivity (spirituality) and bodiliness (materiality). The metaphysical and religious aspirations of man as well as his sociality and inter-subjectivity, are to be traced ultimately to the spiritual component of the human nature. However, man in his concrete existential situation is not a pure spirit; he is only an embodied spirit, and as such he is very much a part of this world so much so that the final realization of his destiny is inextricably bound up with his existence and activity in this world. Hence due attention is given to the material and bodily aspect of the human nature as well. The course arrives at the conclusion that man is a complex and mysterious blending of the spiritual and the material, a person who, even as he is very much rooted in this world by virtue of his materiality, is nevertheless capable of transcending the limitations of time and space by virtue of his spirituality and is naturally destined for immortality.
Kathirparambil  K./Palamoottil  S.

SP 4.  Metaphysics (4)
          Both in the East and in the West, the most basic preoccupation in the philosophical circles has been the problem of “being”. Is there anything existing at all? Is “the existing” one or many? The course on Metaphysics intends to study this question of being “as being”. Though Metaphysics is a “natural disposition” of every thinking person, as a science we need to develop it as a critico-reflective, coherent and systematic body of insights to provide us with an over-arching vision of reality. After indicating the nature and scope of metaphysics, the course will establish transcendental reflection on the sensitivo-rational experience as manifested in direct judgment, as our method and starting point. The course immediately embarks on a deeper analysis of the experiencing agent which will reveal that its inner structure contains the metaphysical components of existence and essence, substance and accidents, prime matter and substantial form – all of which can be cohesively understood by the theory of act and potency since these stand one to another as elements of perfection and imperfection. Then the course will focus on the experiencing agent as a complete agent, acting upon, and being acted upon by others, noting specially the remarkable difference, which exists between total agents who persons and those, which are not. Since critical reflection on our experience reveals both the plurality and unity of reality, the course will proceed to establish that the analogous understanding of being is the best suited to signify its real nature. After thus explaining the extension of the notion of being, the course will finally take up its fuller comprehension, which are the transcendental properties of being.
Kannany T./Kochuveettil P.

SP 5. Cosmology (4)
        Aim of the course is to give a Philosophico- Scientific vision of the Cosmos. For this purpose, the study is divided into three parts. The first part of the course is centred around the nature, scope and relevance of the science of the cosmos in an age of science and technology. This will be followed by a historico - mythical explanation of the cosmos. In between we will have an occasion for religious visions of the universe. The central point of discussion in the second part of the study is the principles of cosmology. In the third part, discussion will be centred around the place of human being in the cosmos.
Kakkattuthadathil T.

SP 6.  Moral Philosophy (5)
       As a prelude to the course on Moral Philosophy, first discussion is centred around the point of relevance of the study of ethics in contemporary period. This is followed by the division of the course into three different parts. The first part includes the study of the origin, nature and scope of  the science of ethics. Besides, the discussion will include different foundations, stages in the development of ethics. The second part of the study is centred around the various theories and standards of ethics. Along with the theory of moral development, attention will be given to various religious ethical theories like Judeo-Christian, Hindu and Islamic ethics. Different moral standards like happiness evolution, perfection, duty and otherness will be discussed in detail. In the final part of the course, specific moral concepts like crime and punishment, Rights and Duties, Virtues and Moral progress will be discussed. Special attention will be given to the topics like ethics of Ahimsa, Existential ethics and Marxian ethics.
Kakkattuthadathil T./Kathirparambil K.
 
SP 7. Theodicy  (5)
         The most fundamental problem man ever faced is his own identity. Whence whither and what, of man. Man is the seeker and the sought, knower and the known. These questions and answers  together constitute various philosophies of life. For a believer, especially a christian “man is the question and God is the answer”. In Fides et Ratio Pope John Paul II says “ it is in the foolishness of  the passion and scandal of the cross of the Christ alone man finds meaning for his existence”. In Theodicy first of all we look into the relevance of the philosophy of  God in response to the challenge of  fideism and biblicism which are opposed to Theodicy. We proceed then to discuss God’s relevance to contemporary man who wants God to be done away with (Feuerbach, Marx, Frued, Sartre, Nietzsche). Man’s basic psychological needs especially the need for an object of devotion and frame of reference (Erich Fromm, Sane Society) are analysed. We proceed then to prove God’s existence through various arguments like the cosmological, ontological etc. Darwinian and Teilhardian evolution theories are critically examined. Chardin’s christo-centric evolution is put forward as a credible alternative theory to prove God’s existence. Moral arguments along with Augustinian and Kantian arguments for God’s existence are examined. The uniqueness and relevance of God-experience is examined critically. In the second part we discuss the essence and attributes of God. Notions like creation and providence are analyzed along with the problem of evil. In conclusion we state  that in dealing with God close cooperation between faith and reason is needed. ‘Fides et Ratio’ says that faith and reason are two wings that lift man to the experience of the Absolute. We remember what Pascal remarked  “The human heart has more reasons of which the reason does not know anything”.  Hence we confess along with Augustine that “ I believe you to understand you (Credo ut intelligam)”.
Kochuveettil P./Vallooran A.

SP 8. Eco-Philosophy (4)
       We are on the brink of a frightening ecological disaster that threatens the earth with destruction and death. Crisis of the eco-system of our planet reflects the deep crisis of human society, its values and ethos. We seem to be close to eco-cide which will be dooms day. We begin the analysis with the primary notions of ecology then we deal extensively on environmental pollution and its impacts in Kerala  and India. As a possible remedy we bring in the idea of sustainable development. Anthropocentrism is the philosophy behind the eco-problems.  The role of Judeo-Christian religion is critically examined. The values and principles of modern technology is examined critically. Ecological notions in Christianity, Islam, Buddhism and Hinduism are analyzed. Fukuvokas philosophy of natural farming is discussed thoroughly . Deep ecology and its three fold senses are analyzed. Colonialism and ecology is another topic of discussion. Finally Mahatma Gandhi’s influence in ecology is discussed. Gandhi said “Pleasure without conscience is sin”.
Njarakunnel G.

SP 9.  Logic  (3)
        This course aims at giving students clear perspectives on the nature of logic by introducing them to the different contemporary scientific methods employed in it. The study of logical terms, classes of propositions, types, rules and fallacies of syllogisms sets the minds for correct reasoning and argumentation. The part on Induction provides them with fundamentals of scientific inquiry. Symbolic logic is aimed at giving the students methods and principles enabling them to prove objectively the validity and invalidity of deductive arguments.
Kannany T./Sujan A.

SP 10.  Philosophy of Science (2)
         The culture, life-styles, beliefs, myths and practices of the contemporary age have almost been imperialistically dominated by science. A philosophy or theology that does  not integrate  the insights of the contemporary science is not a philosophy or spiritually fitting to the age. This course discusses the major schools in the history and philosophy of science like logical positivism,  historicism, historical realism, etc.  A critical assessment of the contemporary interaction between science and religion also forms part of this course.
Edwin X./Pamplany A.

SP 11.  Methodology (1)
         Objective is to enable the student to approach the study in a systematic and
 intelligent manner and develop good study skills. For this purpose students will be initiated to key rules for doing a successful study through different kinds of reading habits, memorizing, concentration and taking notes. A second objective of the course is to enable students now to write research papers, how to prepare and write examinations and how to use the library.
Kathirparambil K./Nariculam A.

 II. Indian Philosophy – Systematic & Historical

      Indian Philosophy is given 13 credits. For the sake of convenience, the subject  is divided into 19 chapters. A general introduction dealing  with the common characteristic features of  Indian Philosophy and the charges levelled against it furnishes the material for the first chapter. In the next three chapters the religion and philosophy of the Vedas, the Upanishads and the Bhagavad Gita are treated in some detail. The fifth chapter is devoted to the consideration of the origin and development of Indian Philosophical systems. They are generally classified into Nastikas and  Astikas (the heterodox and the orthodox systems). The following three chapters (6 – 8) discuss the Cârvâka, the Buddha and the Jaina systems ( the heterodox systems). The next six chapters ( 9 –14) are set apart for the study of the six orthodox systems namely the Nyâya the Vaisesika, the Sâmkhya, the Yoga, the Mîmâmsâ and the Vedânta. Among the several interpretations of the Vedânta, we select only the three typical ones for consideration. In the next three chapters (15-17) the Advaita Vedânta, the Visistâdvaita Vedânta and Dvaita Vedânta are taken up for study. The eighteenth chapter is devoted to a general study of the Modern Indian Philosophy with special reference to Sri Aurobindo, Swami Vivekananda, Tagore, Chattampi Swâmikal and Sri Narayana Guru. In the last chapter (19) we concentrate on the spirituality of the Upanishads with special reference to the Ìsavâsya.
Alunkal S./Thadathil J./Correya B./Payyappilly J.
 

III. History of  Philosophy (HP)

HP 1.  History of Ancient Western Philosophy (3)
      The history of ancient western philosophy extends through a period of over 1100 years, roughly from 600 B.C to 500 A.D. It represents the great attempt made by some of the best minds in the ancient western world to unravel the mystery of NATURE.   The course proposes to examine their marvellous achievements in this endeavor in their connection and continuity beginning with the Ionian school and going up to the Neo-Platonic philosophy of Plotinus. The main focus of the course is on the brilliant contribution of the three all-time greats in western philosophy: Socrates, Plato and Aristotle.
Kathirparambil K./Kannany T.

HP 2.  History of Medieval Western Philosophy (3)
        If ancient western philosophy is built up around the central concept of  NATURE, the rallying point in the medieval western philosophy is GOD. During most of the middle ages, philosophy was considered as the handmaid of theology. ‘Faith seeking understanding’ was the guiding spirit of the medieval history of western philosophy. The course on medieval western philosophy begins with a general introduction dealing briefly with the age of transition from the ancient to the medieval period, christianity and philosophy, patristic speculation and scholasticism. It is followed by a discussion of some of the key figures of medieval philosophy. However, considering the importance of St. Augustine and St. Thomas Aquinas in christian philosophy and theology greater emphasis is laid on the study of the philosophies of these two outstanding thinkers of the middle ages.
Kathirparambil K./Nellikunnel J.

HP 3.  History of Modern Western Philosophy (4)
     With the dawn of the age of Enlightenment, philosophy in the western world enters a new phase of development. Inspired by the two historical events of Renaissance and Reformation, which revolutionized man’s vision of the realms of faith and reason, modern philosophy abandons the cosmocentric and theocentric approaches to reality and takes on an anthropocentric perspective. Accordingly man is the starting point and end of all philosophical research. All philosophical investigation is undertaken for the sake of man. The course on modern philosophy in its introduction acquaints the students with this change in perspective of the historical development of philosophy in the modern period, and then goes on to examine in some detail the different systems of the classical rationalist and empiricist philosophers as well as the Kantian synthesis of these two opposing schools of thought.
Sujan A./Nellikunnel J.

HP 4.  History of Contemporary Western Philosophy (5)
        Man is a historical being. His present springs from his past and is the womb out of which the future will be born. His search for truth has also a history. The History of philosophy is the science, which is concerned with vital and organic development of thought in man’s search for truth. This course studies the major contemporary philosophical trends, situated in their essential connection to the earlier ones and profoundly influencing the intellectual currents and world-views of  today the world over, whether in the literary or political circles. The survey begins with the Absolute idealism of Hegel. Though Hegelianism does not exist as a separate philosophical school today, almost all philosophical thought in the West has come up as a reaction to it. Hence, the ultra-empiricism of the Logical positivism, Linguistic analysis and Pragmatism; the life-affirming thought patterns of the philosophy- of- life – movement; the phenomenological approach to thinking theistic and atheistic versions of existentialism affirming the existential concerns of the concrete individual man over and above the logical rigours of abstract speculation. More than in any other period of history, philosophy today as come out of the confines of the class rooms and played a major role in the shaping of contemporary thinking and living in all areas.
Kakkattuthadathil T./Vallooran A.

IV. Religion and Spirituality (RS)

RS 1.  Introduction to the Bible (2)
      As a general introduction to the Bible, this course aims at familiarizing the students with the Bible as the Word of God in human words. Basic notion about the formation of text of the Old Testament and New Testament, the languages used in the Bible, the major manuscripts as well as about related literature like the Qumran writings, Apocalyptic books and Rabbinic literature are provided. The different literary forms of the Bible and the different method  (criticism) of  dealing with the text of the Bible will be shortly discussed. After giving a general view of salvation history as contained in the Old and New Testaments, the books of the two Testaments are classified and introduced shortly.
Mathirappally S./Mulloor J.
 
RS 2. The Historical Books of the Old